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Scalable HEVC Intra Frame Complexity Control Subject to Quality and Bitrate Constraints

Details

Project TitleScalable HEVC Intra Frame Complexity Control Subject to Quality and Bitrate Constraints
Track Code2015-125
Short Description

An approach that minimizes the computational complexity of High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) intra encoding subject to constraints in bitrate and reconstruction quality. 

Abstract

This technology provides adaptive methods that can adjust video compression parameters and components to accomplish optimal performance. The control mechanism dynamically adjusts to provide a high quality video while minimizing the required encoding time. This technology is also capable of analyzing the video to determine camera activity (tracking, stationary, or zooming) and then associates each activity with adaptive video quality constraints. Thus, in effect, the technology effectively compresses the video for specific tasks that the users, or the owners of the video content, can then adjust.

 
Tagsvideo compression, video processing, video analytics
 
Posted DateDec 16, 2015 7:50 PM

Researcher

Name
Marios Pattichis
Yuebing Jiang
Cong Zong
Gangadharan Esakki
Andreas Panayides
Venkatesh Jatla

Manager

Name
Melissa Castillo

Background

High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) is a video compression standard and is the successor of Advanced Video Coding (AVC). At the same level of video quality as AVC, HEVC aims to provide a 50% reduction in bitrate. Unfortunately, to achieve a bitrate reduction of 50%, HEVC relies on extensions of the current compression methods that come at significant levels of additional computational complexity. In general, maximizing video quality while minimizing bitrate have been of highest concern, but computational complexity and its effects on encoding time have not been considered. Although reducing the complexity of HEVC encoding for both inter and intra coding has recently been of prominent research interest, previous approaches have not taken into account that video compression requirements can vary for reasons such as: networking conditions, energy/power constraints, or varying expectations of video quality. Thus, there is a present need for an approach to reduce computational complexity that supports bitrate and video quality.

Technology Description

Researchers from the University of New Mexico have developed an approach that minimizes the computational complexity of HEVC intra encoding subject to constraints in bitrate and reconstruction quality.  This technology provides adaptive methods that can adjust video compression parameters and components to accomplish optimal performance. The control mechanism dynamically adjusts to provide a high quality video while minimizing the required encoding time. This technology is also capable of analyzing the video to determine camera activity (tracking, stationary, or zooming) and then associates each activity with adaptive video quality constraints. Thus, in effect, the technology effectively compresses the video for specific tasks that the users, or the owners of the video content, can then adjust.

Advantages/Applications

  • Minimizes computational complexity, maximizes image quality, and minimizes bandwidth
  • Minimizes encoding time while delivering sufficient video quality
  • Approach has been tested using HEVC standard test video and the ability to dynamically reconfigure between low, medium, and high profiles
  • Successfully meets the constraints while achieving real-time, high-quality video encoding
  • Substantial bitrate savings can be attained depending on the length of the activity of interest
  • Capable of achieving bitrate savings of 35% and 51.5%.
  • Applications in video processing and video analytics in compression domain

Publications

INQUIRES

STC has filed intellectual property on this exciting new technology and is currently exploring commercialization options. If you are interested in information about this or other technologies, please contact Arlene Mirabal at amirabal@stc.unm.edu or 505-272-7886.

Files

File Name Description
WO 2017/023829 A1 Published Patent Application None Download