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Programmable Release of Proteins from Polymeric Substrates

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Project TitleProgrammable Release of Proteins from Polymeric Substrates
Track Code2017-3244
Short DescriptionThese technologies from the lab of Dr. Jon Pokorski present opportunities for tunable drug delivery using patented processes developed with CWRU's capabilities using multilayered co-extrusion of polym
AbstractThese technologies from the lab of Dr. Jon Pokorski present opportunities for tunable drug delivery using patented processes developed with CWRU's capabilities using multilayered co-extrusion of polymers. In this case, a polymer nanofiber scaffold can be fashioned to include any number of melt extruded nanofibers that are chemically modified to append surface functionality to the nanofibers. Advantages of co-extruded fibers include the ability to process continuously without solvents in controllable dimensions, for instance, as a rectangular shape with much greater surface area and volume than typical "patches" used for drug delivery and wound healing applications. In addition to numerous applications in tissue engineering, other uses include chemical processing, nanoelectronics, fabrics, and filtration. The nanofiber scaffold may incorporate various click-reactive functional groups that may react with bioactive or therapeutic agents such as catalysts, peptides, or small molecules. Recently, Dr. Pokorski and his group have leveraged the fact that wound healing is modulated by complex spatial and temporal regulation of growth factors within a wound site to develop a material that possesses the ability to provide programmed release of epidermal growth factor (EGF) from coextruded polymer fiber patches, which is triggered by the natural biological cascade of wound healing. A genetically engineered EGF containing a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) cleavage site was covalently conjugated to a non-woven poly(-caprolactone) (PCL) fiber mat fabricated by multilayered melt coextrusion. The modified EGF showed rapid release in the presence of a biological trigger, MMP-9, while a control protein showed negligible release. The biologically responsive fiber mat dramatically enhanced proliferation and migration of human keratinocytes in the presence of MMP-9. Thus, Dr. Pokorski has been able to demonstrate the release of a critical wound-healing growth factor as triggered by the biology inherent in the healing process.
 
Tagscontrolled drug release, drug delivery, EGF, Functional Materials, Functionalized Fibers, growth factors, Nanofibers, Polymer Fibers, Polymer-based drug delivery, Polymeric Drug Delivery, Smart Patches, wound healing, biomaterials, tissue engineering
 
Posted DateSep 11, 2017 12:15 PM

Researcher

Name
Jon Pokorski

Manager

Name
Mike Allan